Tag Archives: toronto

Tracking Homeless Deaths

As of January.1st, 2017, the City of Toronto has begun tracking homeless deaths. The process is still in its infancy and has taken the city a while to speak to the public about how the new system is working and what their findings have been.

A press conference was held on January.10th with public health officials, some city councillors discussing how this is a problem that needs addressing in order to fully understand the scope of how many people are dying while homeless. We need this information for raising awareness and improving health.

cathy crowe press conference

Street Nurse Cathy Crowe

Up until now, tracking deaths has involved some volunteers from the Toronto Homeless Memorial Network who have called around to a few agencies once a month to find out who has died. The only other information provided by the city are lists of deaths that have occurred in city-funded shelters and even so, this page is not always up to date.Therefore, this does not include any deaths in hospitals or any other locations in the city.

Needless to say, there are many deaths that are not being recorded and we need to do better. Hopefully this new system will show us the extent of the homeless crisis in our city, but we have yet to hear more.

Advertisements

Homeless Deaths Motion at City Hall

There is a motion recommended by Paul Ainslie and Joe Cressy regarding homeless deaths in the Toronto community.

The following is a list of their recommendations from the City of Toronto website.  City council will be considering this motion on March.31st, 2016.

UPDATE: Motion passed 36-1!!

Recommendations
Councillor Paul Ainslie, seconded by Councillor Joe Cressy, recommends that:

1. City Council direct the City Manager to instruct the appropriate City staff to collect all relevant data related to the deaths of homeless individuals for occurrences within and outside homeless shelters.

2.  City Council direct that the data collected be shared with the public, agencies, City divisions and Provincial Government ministries for the purposes of influencing decision making through policy and legislation.

3. City Council direct the City Manager to correspond with the appropriate staff within the Government of Ontario in support of introducing a provincial mandate to track all deaths of homeless individuals for the purposes of data collection to introduce policy and legislation.

Stone and Glass: We Are All Transient

Myseum is a non-profit organization that celebrates diversity and helps the community to further understand it’s culture and urban spaces. The collective is launching its first annual festival of exhibits exploring different perspectives on the city’s natural, cultural, and historical diversity.The festival runs March.6th-31st.

On March.9th from 6:30-9:30pm at The Church of the Holy Trinity and Trinity Square, the event launch will be taking place that includes an art installation, live music, drumming, historical church tour, food and activism.

The event is a collaboration between The Church of the Holy Trinity, The Toronto Homeless Memorial Network and community artist Rebecca Houston. The premise for the installation is that most people aren’t aware of how many people die homeless and without support. The names of those who have passed away will be projected onto the front face of the church in order for people to take notice.

This is an excerpt from the flyer:

“We all pass briefly through the world, but we are not all treated the same. In Toronto alone nearly 800 people have died on the streets and in temporary shelters since 1985. Many die without a name, listed only as Jane or John Doe. Come for an evening light and sound installation honouring them and calling for change in their memory”

memorialflyer

 

The following is a list of what she is looking for if you are interested in volunteering:
Volunteers to arrive early, (5pm) help set up sound, tables, chairs, food (5-10 people)
Crowd greeting and handing out programs- “Ambassadors” (10-15 people) (from 5:45-7pm)
Help serving food (5 people) (from 6-8:30pm)
Clean up (10-15 people) (9-10pm)

If you are interested in volunteering, please contact Rebecca Houston:rebeccajanehouston[at]gmail.com

Here is the official website.
Twitter: Stone and Glass @homelessevent

Toronto Homeless Memorial

Another month…more names.

I try to make it out to the memorial service when I can. The ceremony is not long and it’s a great way to show support and remember those homeless people who have passed away. The service is also a reminder that this shouldn’t be happening in the first place, people should not be dying because of homelessness.

go1

People come together to read poetry (focusing on what is a priority to the homeless community for that month) and hear music that speaks to the systemic problems that contribute to poverty. Michael Shapcott gives us a run down of the political climate and of course there is a reading of the names, tribute speakers and a moment of silence.

Community members also take the opportunity to announce any initiatives, projects or protests during the service.

If you are in the Toronto area, feel free to stop by and remember. The memorial happens every second Tuesday of the month at noon.

go2

Importance of Names

“The dead cannot cry out for justice; it is a duty of the living to do so for them” 

– Lois McMaster Bujold

Every second Tuesday of the month, some community members gather at the Church of the Holy Trinity in downtown Toronto in order to remember those homeless people who have passed away. One of the hardest parts of attending the Toronto Homeless Memorial, is hearing the list of names that are read during the ceremony. If that wasn’t difficult enough, many of the deceased could not be identified and therefore are read as “Jane Doe” or “John Doe.”

We pride ourselves on our “first world” status, on how “developed” we are compared to other countries. The truth is, we are far from developed. People…and I will repeat this again…people who have died homeless should not have been in that position in the first place. But even further, we cannot even keep track of our citizen’s names? Who were they? And at the very least, what were their names? Where is the dignity?

FullSizeRender

Kumar and colleagues suggest that we are born with an identity and we deserve to die with one, as it is a fundamental right of being born a human (2014:80). Michael Stoops informs us that “[w]hen a homeless person dies they do no often get the same sense of dying with dignity as a housed person” (2007:6). What most of us might take for granted here is that for many, burials and funerals are commonplace. Gravestones are often marked with the names of the dead. Unknown soldiers are also another group that do not get named in death, however, they are much more exalted in our society.

In a recent paper I wrote, I unpack some of the answers surrounding Judith Butler’s question of “what makes for a grievable life?” (2003:10). In neoliberal times, those people engaged in economic gains and productivity tend to be considered more valuable than those people who “do nothing.” We think to ourselves that money makers are more valuable than John Doe’s who die on the streets because they never contributed to society in a productive economic way. Thomas Laquer would agree, “[w]e have a history of commemorating the dead through monuments, which include war veterans, public workers and political figures. Some of these sites only include those who have “done something for humanity” (2015:423). However, if you learn about people who are homeless and hear their stories, then you will learn some of them were “productive” members of society (which is actually beside the point, but needed to be mentioned).

A human life is a human life, and because we have labelled and stigmatized homeless people, we just don’t care enough as a society to learn their names. Tipple and Speak suggest, that “[t]he negative and exclusionary language used to describe and discuss homeless people helps to construct homeless people as ‘other’ and institutionalize their stigmatisation keeping them dissociated and disconnected from society” (Tipple & Speak 2004:2). Society in general seems to be ok with this, to see homeless people as parasitic and therefore who cares about when they die or what their names were, right?

Despite this, some of us are working to change that.

baby feet

Laquer has also pointed out that “[n]aming marks the entry not into biological but into human life” (2015:367). In Ontario, when we are born, we are required to submit our children’s names to the province that in turn, provides a birth certificate. This is an important societal ritual, not only because it is an official government act, but on a personal level, we can understand its importance. Psychologists have done research on the importance of names. The field has also labelled a phenomenon called “The Cocktail Party Effect” which is being able to recognize our name being said in a noisy room and a good overview of the literature can be found here. Nisbett and Ross (1980) inform us that we pay more attention to identifiable victims than statistical ones.

It is clear. Names are important to us all. We should not live in a society where we cannot keep track of our dead. If this is something important to you as well, contact your local MP and MPP and support affordable housing and social supports as a priority in order to prevent this tragedy from happening in the first place.

References

Bujold, L. (2002). Diplomatic immunity. Riverdale, NY New York: Baen Books.

Butler, J., (2003). Violence, Mourning, Politics. Studies in Gender and Sexuality. 4(1): 9-37.

Colman, A. M., Hargreaves, D. J., & Sluckin, W. (1980). Psychological factors affecting preferences for first names. Names, 28(2), 113-129.

Kumar, A., Harish, D., Singh, A., & Kumar, G. A. (2014). Unknown Dead Bodies: Problems and Solutions. Journal of Indian Academy of Forensic Medicine, 36(1), 76-80.

Laqueur, T. (2015). The work of the dead : a cultural history of mortal remains. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Nisbett, R., & Ross, L. (1980). Human inference: Strategies and shortcomings of human judgment. New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Stoops, M. (2007). Dying without dignity: homeless deaths in Los Angeles County, 2000-2007. Los Angeles Coalition to End Hunger & Homelessness.

Tipple, G., & Speak, S. (2004). Attitudes to and interventions in Homelessness: Insights from an International Study. In paper delivered to International Conference Adequate and Affordable Housing for All, June (pp. 24-27).